Jump to content

Soundproofing a rehearsal space


Recommended Posts

So my wife and I (and fellow bandmate) are going to construct a rehearsal building/guest room/office in our back yard.

 

The building will be similar to this one, with the rehearsal space on the first level, and the office on the second.

 

tbd800.jpg

 

Here's my biggest concern. We we'll definitely have to insulate it for temperature control, but what about sound proofing?? I would hate to build the building, move the band to my house, and then we can't play there because of neighbor complaints....

 

Should we buy the soundproof material to go on the walls, or have something installed inside the walls, and then install sheet rock or paneling over that? Also, that sound proofing material is obnoxiously expensive... Does anyone know where to get it cheap, or know of an effective alternative?

 

Thank you friends.

Link to post
Share on other sites

First place id start asking is here--> Tape Op Building Space forum

 

Im by no means a pro, but ive done a few projects...two main things to remember are that 1) Dead air space soundproofs, and 2) Bass frequencies travel longer and stronger

 

Id insulate the walls with thin fiberglass sheets or eggcrate foam and leave at least two inches of air separation between the exterior walls and the new...particle board is better than sheet rock because it absorbs sound waves better...many folks use green glue to attach the insulation,, as it has some absorbing qualities...youll want to carpet the walls and ceiling (home deport regularly has clearance rugs, and more flooring and carpet companies sell remanent cheap) and need to put up a few bass traps...youll want to double pane the windows, or put blankets over them...make sure the doors are doubled and well sealed when closed and the floor is insulated somehow (carpet)...

 

Depending on your power needs, come as close to code as possible...ive seen one bandspace burn down because the owner didnt do his homework on electricity...

Link to post
Share on other sites

First place id start asking is here--> Tape Op Building Space forum

 

Im by no means a pro, but ive done a few projects...two main things to remember are that 1) Dead air space soundproofs, and 2) Bass frequencies travel longer and stronger

 

Id insulate the walls with thin fiberglass sheets or eggcrate foam and leave at least two inches of air separation between the exterior walls and the new...particle board is better than sheet rock because it absorbs sound waves better...many folks use green glue to attach the insulation,, as it has some absorbing qualities...youll want to carpet the walls and ceiling (home deport regularly has clearance rugs, and more flooring and carpet companies sell remanent cheap) and need to put up a few bass traps...youll want to double pane the windows, or put blankets over them...make sure the doors are doubled and well sealed when closed and the floor is insulated somehow (carpet)...

 

Depending on your power needs, come as close to code as possible...ive seen one bandspace burn down because the owner didnt do his homework on electricity...

 

Excellent advice. Especially about the particle board.. I was going to use paneling, but that stuff might even amplify the sound.. :lol

 

We also may go with one story, just to have more money to spend on sound proofing. The two story buildings are more than double the price of the one story. Thanks for the tips!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely hang around over at Tapeop. There are a lot of helpful folks. First thing you want to do before you buy a bunch of expensive 'sound proofing' material is understand this: materials used for sound purposes can be separated into two categories, acoustics, and isolation. Foam, bass traps, carpet are more important for acoustics, how it sounds inside the room. Mass, mass, and air are more important for isolation, how little the neighbors here. The most important materials for isolation are easy to find: insulation and drywall.

 

Double walls are better than single walls, but more expensive and require in depth knowledge so as not to put them up in a way that is worthless. Windows to the outside will be a serious concern. Blankets won't do all that much. If you are looking to be spending time and money on this thing you might also go ahead and check out Build it Like the Pros

Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely hang around over at Tapeop. There are a lot of helpful folks. First thing you want to do before you buy a bunch of expensive 'sound proofing' material is understand this: materials used for sound purposes can be separated into two categories, acoustics, and isolation. Foam, bass traps, carpet are more important for acoustics, how it sounds inside the room. Mass, mass, and air are more important for isolation, how little the neighbors here. The most important materials for isolation are easy to find: insulation and drywall.

 

Double walls are better than single walls, but more expensive and require in depth knowledge so as not to put them up in a way that is worthless. Windows to the outside will be a serious concern. Blankets won't do all that much. If you are looking to be spending time and money on this thing you might also go ahead and check out Build it Like the Pros

 

Thanks Lost Highway. Our biggest concern is isolation, but we'll also be using the space as our studio, so we'd like pretty good acoustics as well. We recorded our first record in a regular old bedroom (no sound proofing) and it sounded great, so I think if we insulate it, put up some drywall or particle board, then we'll be good to go. I also have to make sure we run enough power out there (would hate to trip the breaker on every song). :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Get your isolation going first, then you can get the acoustics you want. If you have a smallish room with a bunch of hard surfaces you will want to deaden it a bit. This is easier than all the building materials you will be using to build up your walls. Throw down a rug, make some absorbing wall hangers, think about putting some on the ceiling (best thing for it is Owens Corning 703 which is insulating fiberglass in a rigid board form).

 

Good for you. Having a nice creative space is good for your brain. I've been striving to have my own 'Wilco Loft' type haven in my basement.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, so after doing some research at Tape Ops and John Sayers, I'm starting to think the storage shed idea isn't such a good idea.. I know that it can be done, but if I want to do it right I'll end up going WAY over budget.

 

I'm thinking of installing a wall in my garage to create two rooms, sectioning off the garage door. The wall will be pretty thick with drywall or particle board, and a layer of insulation (hopefully rock wool if I can find it) in between.

 

I'm hoping the wall alone may be enough isolation since I will have both mass with the thick wall, and the the space in between the new wall and the garage door. If it's not enough, I also may get some foam or fiberglass to line the entire room from ATS.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...