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Jeff to Nels as Bruce to Clarence.


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Well, that's what The Atlantic says.

 

For me it's like comparing apples to oranges. Sax in a band to lead guitar. :dontgetit This is the quote about Wilco in the link...

 

 

 

Like most of the great rock music made today, it seems that the sideman has largely retreated to the indie underground. In the 90s, Pavement’s Bob Nastanovich perfected the role of excitable onstage renaissance man, and over this last decade, Chicago scene veteran Jim O’Rourke has emerged as an indispensable contributor to recordings by Sonic Youth, Joanna Newsom, and Wilco. Speaking of Wilco, one of the biggest and most respected American rock bands recruited avant-garde guitarist Nels Cline to provide inflammatory solos and arty texture for the band’s last two albums (and, it’s been argued, to replace bandleader Jeff Tweedy’s collaborator Leroy Bach and acrimoniously departed sideman Jay Bennett). Like Clemons, Cline is steady, flashy when needed, but never ready to upstage his boss for too long. He might just belong on Wilco's next album cover.

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For me it's like comparing apples to oranges. Sax in a band to lead guitar. :dontgetit This is the quote about Wilco in the link...

 

 

 

Like most of the great rock music made today, it seems that the sideman has largely retreated to the indie underground. In the 90s, Pavement’s Bob Nastanovich perfected the role of excitable onstage renaissance man, and over this last decade, Chicago scene veteran Jim O’Rourke has emerged as an indispensable contributor to recordings by Sonic Youth, Joanna Newsom, and Wilco. Speaking of Wilco, one of the biggest and most respected American rock bands recruited avant-garde guitarist Nels Cline to provide inflammatory solos and arty texture for the band’s last two albums (and, it’s been argued, to replace bandleader Jeff Tweedy’s collaborator Leroy Bach and acrimoniously departed sideman Jay Bennett). Like Clemons, Cline is steady, flashy when needed, but never ready to upstage his boss for too long. He might just belong on Wilco's next album cover.

 

Wow...there is just so much out of whack there. Leroy a collaborator?Bennett yeah. Nels...I mean...geez.

But then again, it's a nice litle shout out.

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To mention Nels instead of John is so laughable I can't even read padt the stupid image they included. What a joke.

 

You know...I was thinking of mentioning John as the sidekick. However, I think the real sidekick, emotional foil is Glenn.

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Guest Speed Racer

You know...I was thinking of mentioning John as the sidekick. However, I think the real sidekick, emotional foil is Glenn.

 

I could get behind that.

 

God, that article was so fucking stupid to mention Nels.

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Was the author just stretching? I think he was looking for comparisons that just don't exist. John is probably the best comparison in Wilco, but does anyone think that their Jeff/John relationship is anything like Bruce/Clarence? The only working relationships that come to my mind are hollywood. Martin & Lewis, Damon & Afflek??

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Was the author just stretching? I think he was looking for comparisons that just don't exist. John is probably the best comparison in Wilco, but does anyone think that their Jeff/John relationship is anything like Bruce/Clarence? The only working relationships that come to my mind are hollywood. Martin & Lewis, Damon & Afflek??

 

I don't think so. Clarence was given the spotlight regularly. Multiple times per show, I would guess (not having ever seen E. Street). John very, very rarely takes the spotlight in Wilco, and when he does, it's not even close to the equivalent of the "EVERYONE ON YOUR FEET FOR THE THE BIG MAN" moment that Clarence gets.

 

Thankfully.

 

If they had said Jay was Jeff's Clarence, they would have been a lot closer to the mark.

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While I'm glad to see Nels getting mentioned on a site as big as The Atlantic's, that description is wrongheaded in so many ways. For starters, the only way anything Nels has ever played with Wilco has ever been inflammatory has been to his back! And "arty texture"? That's one of those phrases that seems like it's descriptive but actually doesn't describe much (sorry...that's the writing teacher in me kicking in). I think this is a good example of what happens when someone who doesn't often write about music tries to write about a band he clearly doesn't listen to much and is stretching to make connections that really aren't there. It doesn't surprise me to read that the writer is in a PhD program--that paragraph is loaded with a lot of words that don't really say a whole lot.

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I don't think so. Clarence was given the spotlight regularly. Multiple times per show, I would guess (not having ever seen E. Street). John very, very rarely takes the spotlight in Wilco, and when he does, it's not even close to the equivalent of the "EVERYONE ON YOUR FEET FOR THE THE BIG MAN" moment that Clarence gets.

 

Thankfully.

 

If they had said Jay was Jeff's Clarence, they would have been a lot closer to the mark.

Herein lies the problem. Jay was kicked out. Jeff stopped liking working with him. Bruce takes breaks from the E Street Band, but did one ever feel he didn't like Clarence personally or professionally?? Jeff (understandably, since he'd just been sued by the guy) had trouble saying nice things about Jay even after he died.

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Herein lies the problem. Jay was kicked out. Jeff stopped liking working with him. Bruce takes breaks from the E Street Band, but did one ever feel he didn't like Clarence personally or professionally?? Jeff (understandably, since he'd just been sued by the guy) had trouble saying nice things about Jay even after he died.

 

That's all true, but I meant in terms of: when they were on stage working together, the dynamic between Jay and Jeff is the closest thing to a Bruce/Clarence dynamic I can think of in Wilco's history. And even that is a bit of a stretch.

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personally, i don't hear much of a wilco - e street band connection, but hey, you never know

 

Me neither, but it's not about sound. The thread is about the way Bruce and Clarence interact(ed) as personalities on-stage, and trying (failing) to find a similar dynamic in other bands.

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