Jump to content

Capitol City


Recommended Posts

So, I'm tired of reading all the bizarre descriptions of Capitol City. The song is growing on me, especially after I realized how long the lyrics have been around. They date back to at least Tweedy's book of poetry "Adult Head" in 2004.

 

Here's some the the descriptions I found:

 

“Harry Nilsson-esque”

“a boozy, dreamy, punch-drunk waltz though Tin Pan Alley, sounding like Cole Porter if he was channeling Charles Bukowski”

“a country waltz with bits of Dixieland clarinet”

“Bobby Charles-stomp”

“a jaunty 1930s-era vaudeville shuffle”

“Tweedy’s rare … excursion into what could be deemed show tune territory – you could imagine someone kicking a leg and doing some serious jazz hands as they belt it out”

“jaunty vaudeville”

“old-timey”

“sprightly jazz”

“orchestral psychedelics”

“shuffling” and “an unnecessary inclusion”

“jaunty, McCartney-easque pop song that includes muffled transmissions, a la ‘Yellow Submarine’”

“odd, post-modern ragtime shuffle … a sort of ‘Penny Lane’ by way of Radiohead’s ‘Amnesiac’ Frankenstein monster that’s too contrived to feel even remotely genuine”

“jazz-flecked [with] some interesting sound collages around its easy-going feel.”

"light, wide-eyed shuffle that almost seems like a vehicle for some soft-shoe footwork ... childlike overtones ... borrows from the kinds of wheezy keyboard colors Garth Hudson might have created decades ago with The Band."

"goofy Randy Newman jaunt and self-conscious winks of atmospheric noise"

"reverential Sgt. Pepper overtones."

"[a] misstep...a show-tune with its schmaltzy shuffle and '20s horns, sort of like how McCartney would go off on his show-tune detours on songs like “Your Mother Should Know” and “Honey Pie.”"

 

Ugh.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 80
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I like the song a lot, kind of reminds me of broken arrow to a certain extent. Both songs create a scene through the lyrics and they both have little breaks in them, and they both kind of have that jazzy sounding section in them.

 

obviously it's much more upbeat than broken arrow, but i was immediately reminded of it when I heard capitol city for the first time

Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like this song. It's grown on me consistently with each listen. The melodies are strong and I love Glenn's selection of field recordings.

 

It's got a county fair / ragtime feel. It's like Nilsson/Beatles crossed with Tom Waits.

 

In terms of Wilco, it reminds me a little of both Why Would You Wanna Live and parts of Pieholden Suite.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like Capitol City a lot. I've been thinking it would make It's a little cutesy, but nothing over the top in my opinion. Based on some of the comments I read leading up to the release of the album I was expecting something wacky.

 

Standing O is the one song I can't get into. It doesn't work for me musically, lyrically or vocally.

Link to post
Share on other sites

So, I'm tired of reading all the bizarre descriptions of Capitol City. The song is growing on me, especially after I realized how long the lyrics have been around. They date back to at least Tweedy's book of poetry "Adult Head" in 2004.

 

Here's some the the descriptions I found:

 

“Harry Nilsson-esque”

“a boozy, dreamy, punch-drunk waltz though Tin Pan Alley, sounding like Cole Porter if he was channeling Charles Bukowski”

“a country waltz with bits of Dixieland clarinet”

includes “spacy synth flurries in the waltz section”

“Bobby Charles-stomp”

“a jaunty 1930s-era vaudeville shuffle”

“Tweedy’s rare … excursion into what could be deemed show tune territory – you could imagine someone kicking a leg and doing some serious jazz hands as they belt it out”

“jaunty vaudeville”

“old-timey”

“sprightly jazz”

“orchestral psychedelics”

“shuffling” and “an unnecessary inclusion”

“jaunty, McCartney-easque pop song that includes muffled transmissions, a la ‘Yellow Submarine’”

“odd, post-modern ragtime shuffle … a sort of ‘Penny Lane’ by way of Radiohead’s ‘Amnesiac’ Frankenstein monster that’s too contrived to feel even remotely genuine”

“jazz-flecked [with] some interesting sound collages around its easy-going feel.”

 

Ugh.

 

Jaunty vaudeille way out of line. Liked the dixieland line I read though. Not much experience with vaudeville but that on I think Greg Kot was reaching.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was playing a rip of this song from the stream thru my home stereo (as opposed to the computer speakers) - my wife walks in the front door and starts singing: "Bang, bang Maxwell's silver hammer came down on her head..."

It's funny how people hear different things in this song - I don't share her opinion, if anything It seems closer to When I'm Sixty-Four.

But actually I hear more of Paul McCartney in the song Whole Love.

What I like more about Capitol City is the 60's supermarket keyboards in this song - reminds me of Donald Fagen's Walk Between the Raindrops. I also like the little boy pout in Jeff's voice when he sings: "Anyways the phones are all broken.."

Like I said, funny how we hear different things.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was playing a rip of this song from the stream thru my home stereo (as opposed to the computer speakers) - my wife walks in the front door and starts singing: "Bang, bang Maxwell's silver hammer came down on her head..."

 

Hit me the first take.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like this song. It's grown on me consistently with each listen. The melodies are strong and I love Glenn's selection of field recordings.

 

It's got a county fair / ragtime feel. It's like Nilsson/Beatles crossed with Tom Waits.

 

In terms of Wilco, it reminds me a little of both Why Would You Wanna Live and parts of Pieholden Suite.

 

^This. Still not my favorite but it's definitely proving to be a grower and I totally agree about the Nilsson vibe.

 

Oh, and I love the "sing along with the clarinets and arguments" line.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest McGuffin

Brutal on first listen, and nothing has changed to this point.

 

It is somewhat in the same vein as Honey Pie, When I'm 64, Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite and even You Gave Me the Answer.

 

But Cap City just doesn't work on any level.

 

TWL has big problems from tracks 7-10 just like WTA does. SBS has problems from tracks 7-11, with one exception.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly, this was one of the first songs that stood out to me on the first listen, and it's been one of my favorites ever since. I really hope they start playing this one live at least periodically, it could be a fun one. I love the Synthesizer arpeggios in the background, and the very cheesy organ sound. Just a fun song.

Link to post
Share on other sites

TWL has big problems from tracks 7-10 just like WTA does. SBS has problems from tracks 7-11, with one exception.

 

I'm still undecided on Open Mind and Capitol City, but I really like Standing O and Rising Red Lung. Standing O has grown on me and I like it for what it is, a brainless rocker in the same vein as I'm a Wheel. Rising Red Lung hit me instantly as one of my favorites on the album.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I'm still undecided on Open Mind and Capitol City, but I really like Standing O and Rising Red Lung. Standing O has grown on me and I like it for what it is, a brainless rocker in the same vein as I'm a Wheel. Rising Red Lung hit me instantly as one of my favorites on the album.

 

I like Open Mind and Capitol City...but I think the record would be better without them. I've always prefered by albums to be between forty and forty-five minutes long. Anymore and most records start to sag. Just my, over simplified, opinion.

 

I Standing O and I feel the album benefits from having it on there. As with 'I'm a Wheel', its not the best track on the record but some times you just need a silly rocker to break up the intensity.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't say I hate it but it's still my least favorite song on the album. To me it sounds like a creative writing assignment set to music (which I guess it kind of is) and it's the only song on the album that is set in a somewhat identifiable place and time. None of the other songs on the album do this (I think), they're more "interior" and timeless. Other folks may like the song for some of those same reasons and that's cool, too.

Also, to my ears the chorus at the end fades out too quick; at first listen I was expecting a longer woozy singalong at the end.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...