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I was wondering if anyone knows what keyboard/effect is used in this song. It sounds really thick with lots of reverb and such, and sounds like hes using a pitch shifter also. Any thoughts?

Edited by JesusEtc
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No idea about what kind of keyboard patch is used, but I've alway assumed that Bennet (?) was using a pitch wheel to get that quick octave shit.

 

Yeah, I'm not sure what was used in the studio (live they are using a Nord Lead 2) but I think the effect is portamento or glide and not the pitch wheel.

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Yeah, I'm not sure what was used in the studio (live they are using a Nord Lead 2) but I think the effect is portamento or glide and not the pitch wheel.

 

I'm not familiar with those effects - how do they work?

 

(I also realize that my original post should have said octave shift, not octave shit :blush )

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I'm not familiar with those effects - how do they work?

 

Well, I might have mischaracterized it. Portamento (or glide) is not an effect like distortion or chorus, but a function in many synthesizers that controls how the synthesizer switches between notes as you play them. It's actually a collection of parameters but the one most used is portamento time, which controls the time it takes for the pitch played to rise or fall to the next pitch played. Short portamento times will not be noticeable but long portamento times will sound like playing slide guitar.

 

I know this is lame, but a good example of portamento is in the solo to "Lucky Man" by ELP (not to be confused with the eminently superior ELO).

 

I hope this helps.

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Well, I might have mischaracterized it. Portamento (or glide) is not an effect like distortion or chorus, but a function in many synthesizers that controls how the synthesizer switches between notes as you play them. It's actually a collection of parameters but the one most used is portamento time, which controls the time it takes for the pitch played to rise or fall to the next pitch played. Short portamento times will not be noticeable but long portamento times will sound like playing slide guitar.

 

I know this is lame, but a good example of portamento is in the solo to "Lucky Man" by ELP (not to be confused with the eminently superior ELO).

 

I hope this helps.

 

Gotcha, thanks. For a while I was playing this on guitar with an ebow and a slide to try and replicate it, but it too unwieldly ;)

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