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Politics 2016 (election edition)


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not exactly (at least according to this washington post article w/ a very misleading, clickbaity title

Apparently in Great Britain the questions "What is the EU?" And "What is Brexit?" Were trending on Google all night long after the polls closed. So apparently voters were well informed.

 

Google reported sharp upticks in searches not only related to the ballot measure but also about basic questions concerning the implications of the vote. At about 1 a.m. Eastern time, about eight hours after the polls closed, Google reported that searches for "what happens if we leave the EU" had more than tripled.

 

 

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Most people are blaming this vote on older voters. I am going to guess this is an equal opportunity chock.

 

LouieB

I saw a map of how the vote broke down. It was pretty much London, Scotland, N. Ireland and Whales wanting to stay and the rest wanting to leave the EU.
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Most people are blaming this vote on older voters. I am going to guess this is an equal opportunity chock.

 

LouieB

http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/brexit-referendum/britain-s-brexit-how-baby-boomers-defeated-millennials-historic-vote-n598481

 

75% of those 24 and under voted to remain. 61% of those 65+ voted to leave. Which group is going to be impacted by this decision the most?

 

I've often wondered it would make sense to have a maximum voting age. if a 17 year old is too young to vote, perhaps a 70/80 yr old is too old? They certainly aren't going to have to live with any bad decisions very long.

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The whole demographic/voting thing makes me wonder.  In the U.S. our congressional seats are dictated by counties, and with more and more young and liberal people congregating in cities it is pretty much a demographic guarantee that rural, and medium density population districts will retain their conservative congressional representation while the urban will not magically be granted more.

 

It's no surprise that the rural English and the metropolitan English don't always see eye to eye.

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I think it will be interesting to see if Italy and France hold referendums in the future.

Also, I wonder what kind of effect this "exit" may have on the national election in Spain in 2 days and Italy in October.

It will be fascinating to watch how things play out.

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The whole demographic/voting thing makes me wonder.  In the U.S. our congressional seats are dictated by counties, and with more and more young and liberal people congregating in cities it is pretty much a demographic guarantee that rural, and medium density population districts will retain their conservative congressional representation while the urban will not magically be granted more.

 

It's no surprise that the rural English and the metropolitan English don't always see eye to eye.

 

Our congressional districts are redrawn every 10 years by the State Legislatures and whatever political party is in power.  They gerrymand the districts to give their party the most power.  https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2015/03/01/this-is-the-best-explanation-of-gerrymandering-you-will-ever-see/

 

Gerrymandering is one of the worst things that currently goes on in our Republic today. 

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I saw a map of how the vote broke down. It was pretty much London, Scotland, N. Ireland and Whales wanting to stay and the rest wanting to leave the EU.

True, but what a testament to British democracy that suffrage was granted to large cetaceans. The fact that they voted to stay is further evidence that they are intelligent mammals.
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True, but what a testament to British democracy that suffrage was granted to large cetaceans. The fact that they voted to stay is further evidence that they are intelligent mammals.

That took me a long time. Quality vocab mate.

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75% of those 24 and under voted to remain. 61% of those 65+ voted to leave. Which group is going to be impacted by this decision the most?

 

I've often wondered it would make sense to have a maximum voting age. if a 17 year old is too young to vote, perhaps a 70/80 yr old is too old? They certainly aren't going to have to live with any bad decisions very long.

The other interesting data I saw was voter turnout by age:  for the 18-24 age group turnout was 36% and for the 55+ group it was 81%.  I don't know the raw numbers of voters in each group but it's telling when turnout is that low.

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The other interesting data I saw was voter turnout by age: for the 18-24 age group turnout was 36% and for the 55+ group it was 81%. I don't know the raw numbers of voters in each group but it's telling when turnout is that low.

I recently analyzed voting data from the U.S. for a stats class I'm taking. In 2014 some 80% of "greatest generation" folks turned out the vote while participation amongst millenials was in the 20-30 range.

 

I know the "rock the vote" mantra is getting cliche but we'll be living in a different political world if the youngest voters will engage.

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Hey remember last week when we sloved gun violence here in the old US of A?

 

That was awesome.

 

Or at least that is what I assume, because no seems to be talking about it anymore.

yup, merica, land of the short term memory

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Hey remember last week when we sloved gun violence here in the old US of A?

 

That was awesome.

 

Or at least that is what I assume, because no seems to be talking about it anymore.

Too busy trying to solve the riddle of BENGHAZI! And the tragic deaths of those 4 Americans to be worried anything else. Probably need another investigation.

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