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My 14-year-old enjoyed See How They Run so much that I'm going to show him Knives Out soon, hopefully in time to take him to see The Glass Onion when it arrives. It's nice to see a throwback entertain

May the fourth be with you! Happy Star Wars Day!

Started up Guillermo Del Toro's latest on HBOMAX: Nightmare Alley. Grim stuff. Will have to take a certain determination to get back into it.    Other recent viewings: Book of Boba Fett - en

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11 hours ago, kidsmoke said:

 

And how is this? :lol

 

Caveat: I'm a huge Flaming Lips fan. It's definitely worth watching. Interesting how they put the whole thing together. The band sounds fantastic in the music footage especially "Feeling Youself Disintegrate". I've always liked that song but it's become epic live. The guitar solo is 1 of my favorites. Steven Drodz is an amazing musician.

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The English

 

Best western series I have enjoyed since Lonesome Dove for me (I don't have subscription TV so can't comment on that Deadwood series). Gorgeous to look at. More violent than Lonesome Dove. Interesting convoluted revenge story. Discovered it was written/directed by the same guy at The Shadow Line which i loved way back. A kind of western Peaky Blinders at its best in terms of atmosphere and set up for some scenes. Nearly in tears at the end.

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13 hours ago, chuckrh said:

Caveat: I'm a huge Flaming Lips fan. It's definitely worth watching. Interesting how they put the whole thing together. The band sounds fantastic in the music footage especially "Feeling Youself Disintegrate". I've always liked that song but it's become epic live. The guitar solo is 1 of my favorites. Steven Drodz is an amazing musician.

 

I haven't had the chance yet to see them live, but the reports of their live shows have always sounded so fun!

 

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We finished the 1st season of White Lotus, last night --- it kind of petered out the last few episodes. Must admit, I am glad it was only 6 episodes. Could not get attached to any of the characters. 

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5 hours ago, calvino said:

We finished the 1st season of White Lotus, last night --- it kind of petered out the last few episodes. Must admit, I am glad it was only 6 episodes. Could not get attached to any of the characters. 

 

Too bad this didn't stay as intriguing as that first season. It sounded compelling!

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I can't explain why I've never seen Valley Girl until now, since it's totally the kind of thing I would have had on repeat as a teen in the mid '80s, rotating between VHS tapes of Better Off Dead and Fast Times at Ridgemont High. It arrived on the scene just as the obsession with all things Valley was winding down--that national fever was grody to the max, fer shure--but it was just in time to capture the era's airy, adorkable don't-take-it-too-seriously vibe. Fittingly, Cage's character is way too earnest to really register as an outsider punk; he's basically a heartsick romantic with awesome hair. Chest hair, that is.

 

Apart from one regrettable song that has, um, not dated well at all, the soundtrack is a trove of bitchin' '80s New Wave and power pop and Coolidge makes a strong case that perhaps every montage in a teen comedy ought to use Modern English's "I Melt with You," even though it's a song about dying in atomic war or maybe precisely because it's a song about dying in atomic war, because there is no better metaphor for teen romance. Adolescence? Gag me with a spoon.

(Watched because I just started reading The Age of Cage, by Keith Phipps.)
 

 

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12 Angry Men was an Election Day choice, watched with my 14-year-old. I've seen this movie countless times, and of course it exists as a veneration of American rational justice and a warning about how that justice is alarmingly fragile. But this viewing is the first time I've felt that the movie's primary value might be in laying bare the channel that exists between white American masculinity and ingrained bigotry.

 

There’s an unintended value, too, in Argentina, 1985, a courtroom drama about the prosecutors tasked with bringing to justice the civil and military leaders who kidnapped, tortured, and murdered citizens as agents of Argentina’s dictatorship that ended in 1983. This case was known as the Trial of the Juntas, and the movie zips through events via a conventional play-by-play structure. Still, it’s much less showy than, say, The Trial of the Chicago 7, which gives the movie a solemn clarity of purpose. Director Santiago Mitre willingly trades grandstanding scenes for quiet moral rectitude, and the result is both honorable and, to be honest, a little too muted. But watching this story as an American in 2022, it’s easy to find bright, blinking red warning lights in its portrait of a nation grappling with how to drive back fascism in a time of sharp political division and cruel, remorseless leaders with cruel, remorseless followers.
 

 

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1 hour ago, Beltmann said:

I can't explain why I've never seen Valley Girl until now, since it's totally the kind of thing I would have had on repeat as a teen in the mid '80s, rotating between VHS tapes of Better Off Dead and Fast Times at Ridgemont High. It arrived on the scene just as the obsession with all things Valley was winding down--that national fever was grody to the max, fer shure--but it was just in time to capture the era's airy, adorkable don't-take-it-too-seriously vibe. Fittingly, Cage's character is way too earnest to really register as an outsider punk; he's basically a heartsick romantic with awesome hair. Chest hair, that is.

 

Apart from one regrettable song that has, um, not dated well at all, the soundtrack is a trove of bitchin' '80s New Wave and power pop and Coolidge makes a strong case that perhaps every montage in a teen comedy ought to use Modern English's "I Melt with You," even though it's a song about dying in atomic war or maybe precisely because it's a song about dying in atomic war, because there is no better metaphor for teen romance. Adolescence? Gag me with a spoon.

(Watched because I just started reading The Age of Cage, by Keith Phipps.)
 

 

Saw it at the theater back in the day - and on Cinemax many times after that -

 

Don't forget The Plimsouls -

 

I guess John Cusack does not care for Better Off Dead. That's a shame.

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