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Maggie Gyllenhaal's directorial debut provides plum roles for Olivia Colman, Dakota Johnson, and Jessie Buckley, but the best thing about The Lost Daughter is how it examines, with genuine honesty and dexterity, the kind of emotional currents that accompany parenthood and middle age that are rarely acknowledged on screen.

 

 

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My 14-year-old enjoyed See How They Run so much that I'm going to show him Knives Out soon, hopefully in time to take him to see The Glass Onion when it arrives. It's nice to see a throwback entertain

Kicked off October, my usual month for nonstop horror, by watching the movie that has horrified the Twittersphere.   There are deep divides inside of Andrew Dominik's Blonde, a movie that is

May the fourth be with you! Happy Star Wars Day!

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5 hours ago, calvino said:

We watched Don't Look Up --- horrible. We were really rooting for the meteor to hit the earth sooner. 

 

In terms of narrative, pacing, performances, and editing, it clunks again and again. (Did you notice that it doesn't have scenes? It only presents sketches for scenes.) I'm baffled by the vigor of its defenders. It's almost as if the mere fact that Don't Look Up has well-meaning satirical intentions means it's automatically a good movie. But well-meaning is not synonymous with well-made.

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I've been stuck inside with COVID, so last weekend I binge-watched The Mandalorian. It's entertaining enough although the writing is kinda bad at times. Alll in all I can't complain because it gave me something entertaining to watch while convalescing. 

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12 hours ago, Beltmann said:

 

In terms of narrative, pacing, performances, and editing, it clunks again and again. (Did you notice that it doesn't have scenes? It only presents sketches for scenes.) I'm baffled by the vigor of its defenders. It's almost as if the mere fact that Don't Look Up has well-meaning satirical intentions means it's automatically a good movie. But well-meaning is not synonymous with well-made.

 

Exactly --- if the intention was to make people actually think about global warming, etc. while making people laugh - it completely missed the mark for me - the humor, due to the writing, was completely lost on me.  (Typically, I enjoy McKay's movies)

 

None of the characters had any redeeming qualities, therefore I couldn't have any empathy for anyone or anything, while watching it.  

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Haven’t watched it yet, but TCM is playing the elusive Looking For Mr. Goodbar at midnight (or in 90 minutes EST). This is one of those oft talked about films that never had a DVD or Blu-ray release in the U.S. & shows up once every five years or so on cable. I believe the issue was the music rights which were rumored to be astronomical with all of the disco songs in the film. Others think it might be due to the subject matter & Diane Keaton’s dark role. 

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6 hours ago, u2roolz said:

Haven’t watched it yet, but TCM is playing the elusive Looking For Mr. Goodbar at midnight (or in 90 minutes EST). This is one of those oft talked about films that never had a DVD or Blu-ray release in the U.S. & shows up once every five years or so on cable. I believe the issue was the music rights which were rumored to be astronomical with all of the disco songs in the film. Others think it might be due to the subject matter & Diane Keaton’s dark role. 

very dark movie & quite graphic. i saw it a real long time ago.

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There is also a made for TV move (sequel) called Finding The Goodbar Killer (1983). I am pretty sure I saw Looking For Mr. Goodbar when I was a pre-teen. I seem to recall a scene with strobe lights or something like that. 

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21 hours ago, u2roolz said:

Haven’t watched it yet, but TCM is playing the elusive Looking For Mr. Goodbar at midnight (or in 90 minutes EST). 

 

Ugh, wish I had seen your post in time! I've been trying to see that movie for a long time.

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On 1/20/2022 at 9:39 PM, u2roolz said:

Haven’t watched it yet, but TCM is playing the elusive Looking For Mr. Goodbar at midnight (or in 90 minutes EST). This is one of those oft talked about films that never had a DVD or Blu-ray release in the U.S. & shows up once every five years or so on cable. I believe the issue was the music rights which were rumored to be astronomical with all of the disco songs in the film. Others think it might be due to the subject matter & Diane Keaton’s dark role. 

 

On 1/21/2022 at 4:09 AM, chuckrh said:

very dark movie & quite graphic. i saw it a real long time ago.

 

Just finished watching this via Hulu --- man, dark is right. Kinda choppy in the storyline - but it works.  

 

Didn't realize it was shot in Chicago, until after I watched it. Assumed it was New York City. The ending was interesting --- not knowing the book ---

Spoiler

at first I thought the dude was stabbing himself. 

 

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Family movie night last night with The Mitchells vs the Machines - entertaining. 

 

A nice cleanser between Looking For Mr. Goodbar and starting up Ozark.

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Not knowing going in that it kinda had some of the same themes as Looking For Mr. Goodbar, watched Don Juan, or If Don Juan Were a Woman. First Bardot movie for me.

 

It's interesting comparing the two movies.

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Absolutely loved this ESPN 30 for 30 documentary about the Buffalo Bills teams of the 90s. It involves so much more than sports, and after watching it I've kinda fallen in love with Buffalo.

 

 

MV5BOGZiMDAwM2YtZWU2Ny00NmNjLWJiMzctNDhh

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This weekend I caught two theatrical releases. Parallel Mothers, which stars Penélope Cruz as a middle-aged single mother who forms a close bond with an adolescent single mother while also grappling with the legacy of the Spanish Civil War, offers many of the usual pleasures of a Pedro Almodóvar movie. I think it's one of his best.

 

Meanwhile, the lazy Rifkin's Festival is one of Woody Allen's worst. (And I say that as someone who has liked his late-career output more than most.)

 

 

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On 1/21/2022 at 7:10 PM, Beltmann said:

 

Ugh, wish I had seen your post in time! I've been trying to see that movie for a long time.

 

Followup: I guess at one time I had set YouTube TV to record the movie if it ever aired, because the TCM broadcast was saved to my DVR list! Sweet.

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Recently I watched two very tense dramas that use real-time to their advantage. First, the nerve-racking, single-take drama "Boiling Point" stars Stephen Graham as the chef at a posh British restaurant who is dealing with professional and personal woes. Even more breathtaking, though, is “The Killing Kenneth Chamberlain,” which chronicles, detail by detail, the real-life story of an elderly black man who was killed by police performing a welfare check. I’m not sure how this riveting, real-time suspense drama fraught with hot-button topicality was so criminally overlooked, especially since it contains a performance by veteran character actor Frankie Faison that ranks among his career best.

 

 

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Persian Lessons - a variation on a holocaust film like Life Is Beautiful was. Some stretch to take on the premise but once you go with the story there were some well conceived ideas/twists etc.

 

Dark Water - a ripping yarn from 19th Century whalers, with some emphasis on the ripping. Didn't like it as much as The Terror, but in similar territory - geographically and theatrically.

 

Toast in Tinseltown - very patchy, but always willing to guffaw at Matt Berry in an internationalised version of Toast of London. With that Fred Armisen guy too.

 

The Outlaws - Stephen Merchant vehicle with the strange appearance of Christopher Walken in a Bristol-based comedy thriller serial.

 

 

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