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Full disclaimer. 

 

I waited until after midnight (wife and kids long in bed) Saturday night to listen to DLP15. I was prepping an overnight smoke of a pork butt, (weber smokey mountain, Kingsford charcoal, pecan and apple chunks, warm water in the basin, pork was salted 24 hours in advance, then rubbed about an hour before the smoke) Once the smoker hit 225, around 12:30, I put the shoulder on, then retrieved a 4-pack of Ommegang Fleur de Houblon Summer Ale (conveniently put on sale from $8.99 to $4.99 the day before), tipped my hat to the day-after full moon, then hit my own smoker for a toke or 3 or 4, then put on my headphones, and had myself a nice little quiet party out in the driveway for the next hour or two. 

 

So, my mood was perfect for a new Dead Show. And that Dead Show was perfect for my mood. Great night. Great show. 

 

And the next day, after about 13 hours on the smoker, the pork butt turned out great too. 

That sounds like a conducive listening situation!   Mind set and setting have a lot of impact, in my experience, to how much I like a given show/listening session.  Getting into the music under headphones is a great way to achieve that, nice!  Plus some pulled pork for days afterwards?  :banana

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Yeah, that's a great show. Hopkins in an interview said he had no recollection of the short period he was playing with JGB.

 

Btw, that disc is selling for $145+ on Amazon

 

That's one I never picked up.  Heard it at a friends house and it is so great.  Hope all those random Jerry releases go digital one of these days.

Minus Phil and Trey, plus John Mayer, Oteil Burbridge, and Jimmy Herring.

 

http://www.deadandcompany.com/

 

This looks like an interesting line up.  It'd be cool if they did an album.  Oteil will fit in really well.  Mayer seems competent.  Of course, Jeff is great.  I wonder if Bob will be the leader.

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That's weird. I wonder why he posted it. Maybe just a scheduling mix up.

I just saw on Col. Bruce Hampton andf the ARU's page that the same quote is up, but attributed to Oteil. Whoever put the same up on Herring's did not put who the quote was attributed to (I have also seen the Herring one you mentioned, since). Just a mistake, it appears, of forgetting to have the "- Oteil Burbridge" at the end. 

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I just saw on Col. Bruce Hampton andf the ARU's page that the same quote is up, but attributed to Oteil. Whoever put the same up on Herring's did not put who the quote was attributed to (I have also seen the Herring one you mentioned, since). Just a mistake, it appears, of forgetting to have the "- Oteil Burbridge" at the end.

That makes sense. Since Oteil and Jimmy are bandmates, and currently touring with ARU, maybe someone posted it on their behalf but mixed up. Sometimes artist pages have more than one person making posts.

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Nice interview with Mayer - it seems like he going at it on the right angle, at least.

 

http://www.billboard.com/articles/news/grateful-dead/6655956/john-mayer-grateful-dead-and-company-interview

He seems really into the Dead. Looking forward to hearing this. Quotes from othe band members seem positive too. I think Mayer will fit in. He's got a good tone for the music. I wonder if they'll do any of his song. He's got some counteyish stuff on his most recent albums. Might fit in well.

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Well, I guess Mayer isn't a complete tool after all. He's really thrown himself into the GD canon. Interesting.

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That HCS is undoubtedly one of the very best, if not THE best version ever done. Latvala himself has said as much, and who in their right mind would argue with Dick?

I agree with Dick on this one, the 12-19-73 Here Comes Sunshine, but I don't always.  He was pretty outspoken for not liking much at all from the 80s.  I can understand that opinion even if I don't share it.  I know he was constrained a lot in his picks by vetos from the band over performance and sound quality and stuff, but he had his definite biases, based on what I've read, towards the late 60s and the out-there jamming of the early 70s.  No doubt he was a well informed and extremely passionate listener of GD.  Here is another interesting piece from the deadessays.blogspot.com that tells alot about what kind of person he was and how the Dick's Picks weren't purely just his picks.  http://deadessays.blogspot.com/2011/02/dick-latvala.html

 

winterland1972, thanks for that suggestion of the 11-11-73 Big River.  I don't have the box set and the Charlie Miller SBD on archive.org has a huge static distortion in the middle of the song.  Is it clean on the official release?

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winterland1972, thanks for that suggestion of the 11-11-73 Big River.  I don't have the box set and the Charlie Miller SBD on archive.org has a huge static distortion in the middle of the song.  Is it clean on the official release?

I haven't listened to the Charlie Miller SBD, so I can't make a comparison, but yes, there is a 10-second (or so) segment with significant static distortion on the official release as well. 

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Peter Simmons interviews the Man about The Grateful Dead movie

 

 

In 1975, photographer Peter Simon sat down with Jerry Garcia, as Garcia was working on what would become The Grateful Dead movie. Peter recently rediscovered his recording, which had originally aired on WVOI, a pre-cursor to WMVY.

 

https://soundcloud.com/mvyradio/peter-simon-interviews

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Anyone see the Dan Rather interview of Weir on AXS tv?  I recorded it, watched about half of it so far.  Thought it was very good.  All the old footage (mostly from the GD Movie) and photos made me wistful. Still hard for me to wrap my mind around the fact of how much of a mainstream American cultural institution the Dead have become.  Anyhow, I think AXS runs these shows on repeat pretty often, worth watching. 

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on the FTW Chicago shows: Ready to Die: Three Days of Drugs and Disintegration With the Grateful Dead

 

http://noisey.vice.com/blog/the-grateful-dead-chicago-fare-thee-well-2015

Interesting piece.  I think it ended up explaining a lot about why I didn't want to go see these shows.  At first I didn't connect with this guy because I can't really relate to gangsta rap and/or grungey 90s So. Cal. culture, but the more I read, the more impressed I was and the more I found myself sympathetic to his point of view and his experience.  I shared it with some friends who never got to see the Dead or only saw them once or twice in '95 but who are quite into any current endeavor of the former Dead members and it lead to some interesting discussion about people who got to see the Dead and people who didn't and the eventual time when none of the Dead or their original late 60s hippie fans will be alive.  And then there is the difference between the fans, present and past who appreciated the social cultural part of the scene as opposed to those like me for whom is was all about the music.  If the music is not strong, the "scene" matters very little to me.  I did and still do love rocking out with other people who are fully engaged in the music, like you would find in the dancing section of Dead shows in the past, but only if the music is strong.  Once the music starts to falter for me, the scene holds almost no appeal.  I have a buddy who just loved being back in the scene and told me he wasn't too bothered about the quality of the music at the recent Fare Thee Well shows.  He and I couldn't be more different on that point.  It makes me really miss and appreciate the times when the music was great AND the scene was strong and everyone could have a great time together regardless of what they dug most about going to see Dead shows.

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Interesting piece.  I think it ended up explaining a lot about why I didn't want to go see these shows.  At first I didn't connect with this guy because I can't really relate to gangsta rap and/or grungey 90s So. Cal. culture, but the more I read, the more impressed I was and the more I found myself sympathetic to his point of view and his experience.  I shared it with some friends who never got to see the Dead or only saw them once or twice in '95 but who are quite into any current endeavor of the former Dead members and it lead to some interesting discussion about people who got to see the Dead and people who didn't and the eventual time when none of the Dead or their original late 60s hippie fans will be alive.  And then there is the difference between the fans, present and past who appreciated the social cultural part of the scene as opposed to those like me for whom is was all about the music.  If the music is not strong, the "scene" matters very little to me.  I did and still do love rocking out with other people who are fully engaged in the music, like you would find in the dancing section of Dead shows in the past, but only if the music is strong.  Once the music starts to falter for me, the scene holds almost no appeal.  I have a buddy who just loved being back in the scene and told me he wasn't too bothered about the quality of the music at the recent Fare Thee Well shows.  He and I couldn't be more different on that point.  It makes me really miss and appreciate the times when the music was great AND the scene was strong and everyone could have a great time together regardless of what they dug most about going to see Dead shows.

 

I've not read this article, but I totally know what you're saying.  I love that people out there are getting to see the boys in their various incarnations over the years.  But for me, yes, the music was the main attraction.  When the music was great, then the scene was just icing on the cake.  That's why I liked JGB shows.  Everyone there was there for the music…for the most part.  The other part of this is that I worked so hard to become a credible Deadhead and I think the 'scene' is at fault for that…and me and my teenage identity crisis.  Gotta look a certain way etc. 

 

But when the music is bad, the scene is just a squalid nightmare.  That's why I quit going to so many shows near the end.  Music was touch and go and I didn't care about hanging out before hand.  Same with Phish.  I've gotten some flack here for my opinions on Phish 3.0.  But I just wouldn't enjoy the show while others were because I'm stuck in 90s Phish.  God bless those kids out there who are enjoying the scene.  Sadly, it's not for me anymore.  I found the Furthur, Dead, PLQ scenes to be kind of sad, to be honest.  Not putting people down, but a lingering sadness about the end of an era still felt decades later.  Another thing I have no patience for is shitty Dead cover bands.  I've been hoodwinked into playing in some over the years and I leave just hating the whole endeavor.

 

FWIW, I've been going through the studio albums.  Anthem is so great!

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And even though that writer was mercilessly honest in pointing out some of the less attractive sides of the cultural scene at the Fare Thee Well shows, he still managed every now and then put all that criticism and judgement aside and get swept up in the idealism of it and the (nostalgic?) force of the music or at least of the songs being played.  I liked how he was able to hold a variety of mindsets and perspectives at different times during the weekend, it made his essay more realistic to me. 

 

I was never one of those "its all good, it can't be bad music if Jerry is playing it" Heads, but I probably would've benefited from moving a couple notches in that less critical direction.  I'm sure there is something good in the music of Fare Thee Well (especially on night One of Santa Clara), even though overall it was, IMO, a very pale version of what the Dead did in their prime, but I still would rather listen to old GD shows in the archive, turn 'em up really loud and dance.  I'll never run out of recordings to listen to, there is just so much of it.

 

After Jerry died, a group of Heads in Sonoma County, CA hosted some public dance parties at clubs and community centers at which we'd rent a PA, get a really clean tape and play it loud.  We charged $5 to cover costs and ended up doing about a half dozen of these before it lost steam, but I frickin' loved it, dancing with a bunch of Heads to Binghampton '77 or some other performance years before my time.  I'd do that again in a heartbeat if I the opportunity were there.  I'm sure a lot of people think that is weird to dance to a recording rather that a real live performance, but I didn't.

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